Design for Health: University Research Reveals Surprised Solution to Relieving Stress

Wakefield Research found that 68 percent of people experience stress at least once a week, while 32 percent feel stressed daily. One in four women reports feel stressed multiple times per day. There are many reasons people feel stressed today, from financial and health concerns to seemingly endless to-do lists.

The University of North Florida has found that even the simplest flowers can make a difference. People who had flowers in their homes for a few days experienced decreased stress levels and improved moods.

These findings align with other behavior research studies by university researchers such as Texas A&M, Harvard, Rutgers, and Texas A&M. They show that flowers can make people happy, increase compassion, and foster creativity.

A 2018 study entitled The Effect of Flowers on Perceived Stress among Women concluded that flowers in indoor settings can lead to a statistically significant, meaningful decrease in stress.

There is increasing evidence that environmental design has a positive impact on health. It is now both intuitively and scientifically proven that interiors with elements of nature such as flowers promote well-being,” stated Erin LargoWight, Ph.D. Associate Professor at the University of North Florida’s Department of Public Health.

These are the specific results:

A decrease in stress was seen in the average number of women who had received and used flowers. This is a statistically significant reduction.

Flowers have the potential to reduce stress in women. This is likely because they offer nature contact and a proven health-promoting environment.

Most participants who received flowers reported that they felt happier.

Largo-Wight stated, “Our findings are important for public health because adding flowers to stress reduction does not require much effort.” Flowers can bring calm to a life that seems chaotic .”

UNF Study Methodology

This experimental study involved a representative sample of 170 women aged 18 to 65. Participants were blinded to the purpose of this study and randomly assigned to one of three groups: Flower home delivery (n=58), Comparison gift home delivery (n=55), comparison group, or no delivery (n=57), or control group. The control group, which did not receive the delivery, was the no-delivery. On day five or six of this study, the comparison and flower groups received the delivery. The comparison group received an arrangement with flowers, while the flower group received a luxury candle of approximately the same value. The items were prepared by local florists and gift shops and delivered to the recipients. All groups completed the online stress survey for 12 consecutive days. This was the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ), which was administered at baseline (before delivery ).) and post-test (after delivery span>).

“Our findings are important for public health because adding flowers to reduce stress doesn’t require great effort to produce a meaningful effect,” stated Largo-Wight. Flowers can bring calm to a life that seems chaotic .”

Stress today can be anything from financial and health issues to seemingly endless to-do lists. Most people can relate to this constant state of stress.

The University of North Florida has found that even the simplest flowers can make a difference. People who had flowers in their homes for a few days experienced decreased stress levels and improved moods.

These findings align with other behavior research studies by university researchers such as Texas A&M, Harvard, Rutgers, and Texas A&M. They show that flowers can make people happy, increase compassion, and foster creativity.

A 2018 study entitled The Effect of Flowers on Perceived Stress among Women concluded that flowers in indoor settings can lead to a statistically significant, meaningful decrease in stress.

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